Summit Prep Blog - Part 6

Focus on School Grades or the SAT/ACT?

We are constantly faced with choices and trade-offs. Interact on social media or study?  Watch TV or go to the gym?  Leave a note that you accidentally scratched someone’s car or drive away?  Whether we choose to follow the right course or not, we usually know the productive, healthy, and ethical answer to most choices and trade-offs. But, what about the choice to study more for the SAT/ACT or for a school test the next day?  What should we choose?

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For Successful College Acceptance

So as December 15th rolls around and most are preparing for the holidays, December has a different meaning to the high school senior. On or around December 15th is that fateful day when your early decision email should arrive.  Are you in? Are you done? Are you deferred or, even worse, have you been rejected?

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Life, Liberty, and the LSAT

Making a Murderer brought national attention to the possibility of wrongful convictions and to the legal skills needed to avoid them.  Because the legal skills needed to prevail in court are also those tested on the LSAT, one of the pivotal LSAT topics was shown to be critically important to Brendan Dassey’s life and liberty.

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An Example of Education in Action

As I wrote in the post about why education is meaningful, I was a staunch believer that most education was useless.  Past tense (“was”) is key here.  Having lived longer, I see the value of all education, and I wish that I had valued all education more when I was in school.

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One Tip for Increased Productivity

We are all trying to become more efficient and productive.  Who would not want to do more in less time?  And, there is a massive amount of advice on the subject (such as “The 4 Hour Work Week” by Tim Ferriss).  If you use a computer, here is my single recommendation for getting more done in less time: a second computer monitor.

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For Students Studying for the LSAT

For those students wanting to become lawyers, they might lament that there are no real-world applications of the LSAT.  The LSAT is filled with questions about arguments that make little to no sense, reading comprehension passages that appear to be the very embodiment of cruel and unusual punishment, and logic “games.”  How exactly does this all determine who has what it takes to be a lawyer?  Is the LSAT just a crucible to bear before entering the hallowed halls of law school?

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What is Logic?

Formal logic is the fundamental language which underlies modern mathematics and computer science. And yet students are rarely exposed to it before college, if ever. This has led to it having a reputation for difficulty and obscurity. Nothing could be further from the truth!

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